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Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Thgl73 (IP Logged)
Date: September 26, 2009 07:22PM
Hi,

is here one member who can tell me why or if rats have not good meaning in china and its not a good for gift (im from Hameln and the rat is a historic symbol of my hometown) and when i travel i like to give friends a rat, as a soft toy as present.

So i dont whant to make a mistake and that why i need help.

Thanks for help!

Thorsten

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/28/2009 10:26PM by Olive.

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Meredithz (IP Logged)
Date: October 05, 2009 11:03PM
Hi,

the symbolic meaning of rats in chinese culture has changed over time. there's an old chinese saying that when rats run on streets everyone shouts "kill them". so as you can see rats are real troubles to chinese in the past and they had to be eradicated. but now things change. people relate rats to swiftness, reproductivity and even keep them as pets like guinea pig. so in my opinion it's perfectly ok to send your chinese friends a toy rat as a gift. children always love furry stuff!

Alles Gute aus China

meredith

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Thgl73 (IP Logged)
Date: October 06, 2009 01:37AM
Thx you for that nice information!

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Herohelps (IP Logged)
Date: October 28, 2009 04:56AM
I agree on meredith's view.
In China .rats are hateful.

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Jasuk (IP Logged)
Date: October 28, 2009 10:00AM
The Rat is in Chinese horoscope, i have always thought rat was respected in regards to wealth, shrewd business and cleverness.

I quote "Being born a Rat is nothing to be ashamed of. In China, the Rat is respected and considered a courageous, enterprising person. It is deemed an honor to be born in the Year of the Rat and it is considered a privilege to be associated with a Rat. Rats know exactly where to find solutions and can take care of themselves and others without problems. They use their instinctive sense of observation to help others in times of need and are among the most fit of all the Animal signs to survive most any situation"

you can read it yourself, i know it just a website but must have some truth in it:
[url=http://www.usbridalguide.com/special/chinesehoroscopes/Rat.htm][/url]

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Xtaaxtw (IP Logged)
Date: January 06, 2010 04:10AM
China has a proverb: The target of universal detestation, everybody shouted hits. If you want to give the gift in China, you should better not give gift related to rats, but Mickey Mouse is exception.I think...... But also has many exception situations Mouse wedding) , the rat is one of Chinese zodiac.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/09/2010 11:18AM by Olive.

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Suziya (IP Logged)
Date: January 10, 2010 10:28AM
What about other animals? Are there certain animals that are held in higher respect than others, especially besides the signs of the zodiac? Anything that would seem strange to a foreigner?

~ 蘇子婭

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Uberche (IP Logged)
Date: January 13, 2010 09:59PM
There's a lot of animals they eat that might seem strange...

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Lex87 (IP Logged)
Date: January 19, 2010 07:16PM
I'm not too sure what the rat symbolizes in Chinese culture but it's a fun animal to paint if you're into Chinese brush painting. It takes a lot of practice to get the strokes right though.

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/19/2010 07:18PM by Lex87.

Re: Chinese culture and perception of animals
Posted by: Sophiacomic (IP Logged)
Date: January 20, 2010 09:38PM
The Rat is in Chinese horoscope, but in china we don't like it .



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